City of Rocks State Park (Faywood, NM)


Our final night of camping on this road trip was spent at City of Rocks State Park, north of Deming in the middle of the Chihuahuan desert, a unique, surreally beautiful area where every campsite is nestled among huge boulders.

City of Rocks features a wide field of boulders created 35 million years ago when a volcanic eruption from the Emory Caldera rained down tuff that hardened and was eroded by wind and water over millions of years. Some of these rocks are 40 feet high and are quite beautiful, ignimbrites of pinks, blue-grays, and browns, and strewn over 1,200 acres in the middle of the Mimbres valley, an odd sight in an otherwise flat and featureless terrain. Some of these upright megaliths reminded me of Stonehenge, but mostly they are randomly scattered, sometimes forming lanes between them that suggest urban pathways. The park also includes an astronomical observatory (one of two in the New Mexico state park system) that has a 14″ telescope. Keeping with the astronomical theme, the various sections of the park, arranged in loops, are named after constellations.

At night, without light pollution, dark-night-sky viewing is possible. On the night of our stay, the skies were clear; we might’ve seen the Milky Way as we did at Chaco Canyon if it weren’t for a bright full moon. We heard coyotes howling overnight and in the early morning.

Among the many desert plants here, the ocotillo stood out as the most unusual, tall and cactus-like with near vertical stems branching at ground-level and spiny appendages all along them. For most of the year, they can appear to be dead, but we were fortunate to have seen them fully leafed out and topped with crimson flowers, a direct result of prior rains.

Too bad we were in a rush to get to the Grand Canyon. This is a campground worthy of a longer stay.

City of Rocks State Park
Faywood, NM
575.536.2800
 
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Camping at Leasburg Dam State Park (Las Cruces, NM)


The wind and rain clouds were rolling in over Las Cruces as we arrived in the late afternoon. Though we’d already canceled camp sites on this trip because of weather, we decided to pitch camp anyway and hope for the best. After dinner, we headed straight to our next camping site at Leasburg Dam State Park, outside Las Cruces.

Each campsite has a concrete pad so we had no problem setting up. As we were going to be here for a single night, we attached the tent to the back of the Subaru, extending the living space and making it considerably easier to get to things if the weather got bad.

Our tent conveniently straps to the back of the car

Our tent conveniently straps to the back of the car

The attached tent extends the living space

The attached tent extends the living space

That night, a hellacious storm dumped rain with heavy wind. It was so gusty that the tent made flapping noises all night. Furthermore, thunder boomed overhead and lightning crackled and lit up the tent. But the topper was the train that was some distance away but sounded as if the tracks were right next to our tent, an illusion of the night air. The conductor also saw fit to toot the whistle every time the train roared by. It was by far the most restless sleep we ever had camping.

The following morning, all was quiet though ominous storm clouds still hovered overhead. It was nonetheless a spectacular canopy just as the sun was rising.

Cloud cover the morning after a thunderstorm

Cloud cover the morning after a thunderstorm

In the morning, we packed up our wet tent and, based on a weather prediction of more rain, decided to cancel the reservation we had for the next two nights at a campsite in Alamogordo.