New Mexican Pistachios


We were surprised to learn that New Mexico grows quite a lot of pistachios. One normally associates the nut with California.

The state has the largest pistachio growing area in the country, though not by volume. The San Joaquin Valley of California enjoys that distinction. Arizona also grows it. Hot and dry conditions are required for optimal growth. In Alamogordo, there are two farm outlets along the main highway where we sampled pistachio products and local wines. The staff at Eagle Ranch Farm was by far the friendlier and eager to explain pistachio farming, roasting and packaging. Male trees are needed to pollinate female trees and, unlike most other deciduous trees, depend on wind to spread pollen. Surprisingly, immature nuts on the female tree are pinkish and turn green when ready. The swelling nutmeats are responsible for splitting the shells rather than a roasting or mechanical process.

Pink when immature, pistachios turn green as they ripen

Pink when immature, pistachios turn green as they ripen


To add their distinctive mark, New Mexican producers market their pistachios with chile flavors, both green and red.