Hubbard Glacier is Defying Global Warming Trends

The first I saw Hubbard Glacier was from the upper deck of the cruise ship. The captain announced its approach over the PA system. Passengers positioned themselves wherever they could get a good look. I estimated that the vessel got no closer than a few miles because the glacier, the largest in North America at... Continue Reading →

Shakes Glacier Is Receding at a Fast Clip

At the end of a jet boat ride on the Stikine River is Shakes Glacier. It has the unfortunate reputation for being one of the fastest receding glaciers in Alaska, at a current rate of 350ft/yr, according to the Shakes Glacier Survey Team. Because of this, icebergs regularly calve from the terminus, some of which... Continue Reading →

Eagle Eyes

There are terms we use about which we don't give much thought. On the face of it, their origin seems obvious enough, it's just that we have no personal experience to give the expressions much tangible significance; they're part of the common vernacular. 'Eagle eyes' is one of them. I was on a boat tour... Continue Reading →

Departure Delay in Alaska

It seems the common murre, also known as a guillemot, needs a good head start to fly. With a relatively hefty body compared to its wings, departure takes a bit of effort and once aloft, it can't maneuver very well. If you were to suddenly stand up in its flight path, there's a good chance you... Continue Reading →

Twin Titans

The main reasons to visit Hiram M. Chittenden Locks are the fish ladder to see the spectacular return of salmon and trout to their spawning sites and the passage of seagoing vessels through the locks between Salmon Bay and Shilshole Bay. The Ballard Locks, as it's more commonly known, is one of Seattle's top tourist... Continue Reading →

Twisted Fir

The Cascade Lake Loop on Orcas Island in Washington is a pleasant way to explore part of Moran State Park. Its most interesting feature is a twisted Douglas fir that seems out of place. The other evergreens all around it are straight and tall, making you wonder what traumas it withstood during its lifetime. Its... Continue Reading →

Hope Springs Eternal

Spring is my favorite season. Winter chill gives way to a time of regrowth, awakening, rejuvenation and hope. Naturally, this is the time I like to visit local gardens. Seattle has a little treasure, not nearly as well known (if at all) as University of Washington's Arboretum, Kubota Garden or the Bellevue Botanical Garden. At... Continue Reading →

Great Blue Heron

This is as close as I've ever gotten to a great blue heron. I also had a little help from a telephoto lens.  The snapshot was taken at the estuarine reserve called the Skagit Wildlife Area north of Seattle where on luckier days I might've seen thousands of snow geese resting or flying overhead.

What’s in a Tulip?

Washington's Skagit Valley has some of the world's great tulip fields. In April, hordes of visitors descend on Mount Vernon to take in the brilliant displays, a spectacle well worth the hour and a half's drive north from Seattle. Admirers take plenty of pictures because the swaths of color never cease to amaze. The tendency... Continue Reading →

COA, Great Mexican Dining in the Skagit Valley

Fire burn, and caldron bubble. The Bard came to mind because the broth bubbled non-stop in a fiercely hot molcajete, like a fire underneath that didn't extinguish until dinner was almost done. This wasn't a witches' brew but a tasty stew of grilled chicken, carne asada, shrimp, nopal, tomatoes, pico de gallo, pickled red onions and queso asadero... Continue Reading →

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