Ambivalence about Grand Teton National Park


After the jaw-dropping visit to Glacier, my wife and I headed for another national park we never visited. Grand Teton was predictably snowed in when ten years ago we drove past on our way to Yellowstone. We’d finally get to see what many consider the most beautiful mountain range of the Rockies. As I’ll explain later, the experience was a mixed bag.

We had a choice of three routes between Butte (MT) and Jackson (WY). The fastest would have been to skirt Yellowstone altogether via I-15. Time was in fact a factor; we had to get to Teton Village by 5pm for a tour. Still, to skip Yellowstone while in the area would seem like an opportunity lost. Could we at least witness Old Faithful?

Confident we could do it, I opted to drive into the heart of Yellowstone, then take the south entrance out. Was that a mistake. As is becoming more commonplace at national parks, Old Faithful was overwhelmed with tourists with traffic to match. A visitor center ranger informed me that Teton Village was another 2½ hours away. We couldn’t spare the 45 minutes until the next Old Faithful eruption, so we reluctantly hopped back in the car but got to drive through a part of Yellowstone we missed last time, Yellowstone Lake.

I took this picture of Old Faithful in April 2007

Yellowstone and Grand Teton could almost be mistaken for a single park. They’re separated by a blink of an eye, a mere 8 miles via Highway 89 (half that, if you consider park boundaries) which traverses the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway.

The parks couldn’t be more different in character. Yellowstone, of course, is a showcase for the world’s greatest geothermal attractions. An enormous caldera is all that remains thus far of several stupendous volcanic explosions that literally wiped out all living things for hundreds of miles around. To me, the idea of a still active supervolcano that could literally go off at any time is a little unnerving.

The Tetons, on the other hand, are a picture-perfect mountain range that rises majestically above the Snake River plateau, the result of massive fault-blocking from the stretching of the North American continent and of plate tectonics. Glaciers gave the Tetons their present rugged shape.

As an anecdote, French Canadian trappers are linked to the naming of both parks. Yellowstone (or, yellow stone) is the English translation of the name given to the river by the trappers (Roche Jaune), the equivalent of the Hidatsa tribe’s name for it. Then, there’s Grand Teton. The story goes that trappers saw fit to name three peaks Les Trois Tetons after female breasts, the tallest called Grand Teton, which by now you’ve guessed the meaning of. Some historians, motivated perhaps by Victorian propriety, insisted that they were named after the Teton (Titunwan) Indian tribe. Guess which interpretation endures? Regardless, the park continues to be known by its French name which most of us can innocently repeat without embarrassment.

Because of the Yellowstone detour, we barely made our rendezvous time with BrushBuck Guide Services in Teton Village for a wildlife viewing tour, the reason we were strapped for time after leaving Butte. It was also why I couldn’t afford to stop to take snapshots. I had to suck it up as we passed Snake River Overlook where Ansel Adams took his famous photo.

We only got to the Village a half hour before the tour. Over the tour’s four-hour length, we did get to see some animals: pronghorn antelopes, moose, ground squirrels, elk and bison, but no bears, bighorn sheep or wolves. It was too much to expect to see them up close, so we were content to look at them from a distance with binoculars, telephoto lens, telescope or our own eyes.

At one overlook, with her telescope our guide was able to spot an animal practically camouflaged by trees and shrubbery.

See if you spot what the guide picked up with her telescope

As in any tour where wildlife sighting is hit or miss, much of the guide’s commentary had to be filled with lots of interesting facts on the area’s landscape, history and biology.

On the following day, our only hikes started on the other side of glacially carved Jenny Lake which we crossed by shuttle boat (for a fee). (You can also walk around the lake.) At the landing, the trail splits to the left and right, the left leading to Hidden Falls and Cascade Canyon, the right to Inspiration Point and Paintbrush Canyon. The falls were a real gem. There was no evidence of the falls at first, just Cascade Creek roaring impressively through chasms.

But a short walk to the side of a foot bridge revealed why it’s called Hidden Falls because it suddenly came into view.

Hidden Falls

Inspiration Point took longer to reach. It had expansive views of Jenny Lake.

Inspiration Point

Photographers have been inspired to capture the Tetons like Ansel Adams did—as a dramatic backdrop to the Snake River, a juxtaposition of craggy range and sinuous waterway. The most striking images are a combination of mountains, river, golden hour light and clouds. Because I never got an opportunity to take this shot, I’ll share again an image taken by Jim Brandt (who is husband of my wife’s cousin’s) in October 2013. It’s plain to see that Teton’s appeal owes much to how the absence of foothills accentuates the drama of the abruptness of the range.

Teton range (by Jim Brandt, October 2013)

We spent only two nights in Jackson. Is that enough time to spend in the Tetons? The answer is an obvious ‘no,’ but we had little choice. My wife and I would love to have stayed longer, but the rate at one of the chain motels (hint: it has a number in its name, and it isn’t 6), certainly nothing to write home about, was an astronomical $265 per night! This is what you can expect to shell out during the prime summer months. Most other inns and lodges, including those in various parts of the park, will ream you even more. It’s hard to know if this situation is the result of ‘gentrification’ by the rich and famous who live here or the properties are just taking advantage. While the Tetons are a beautiful public treasure, it’s likely I’ll never return, the first time I’ve ever had such sentiments about a national park.

Wondrous Zinnia


The Bellevue Demonstration Garden in my neck of the woods is featuring an entire row of zinnias, flowers I never paid much attention to until now. The specimen above is already fully matured with the outer (ray) florets beginning to wilt, but what struck me was the crown of disk florets that even the bee was impressed with. They continue to flower like that, each ring blossoming above the spent one below, until the disk looks almost like a pineapple.

Beyond Lake McDonald (Glacier National Park)


How much more reward could I get when I first got to Glacier National Park than to have this view just steps from my room? Lake McDonald was only a teaser for the best was yet to come.

Prickly Beauty


I love cactus flowers. They are for me the most arresting sight in the desert. Come springtime, from out of these spiny plants pop up these spectacular flowers. The contrast is remarkable, delicate beauties that seem to float on a bed of thorns.

Mammillaria wiesengeri (Volunteer Park Conservatory, Seattle, WA)

Claret cup cactus, Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Capitol Reef National Park, UT)

White torch cactus, Echinopsis spachiana (Mexican Hat, UT)

Mammilaria wiesengeri (Huntington Library Desert Garden, San Marino, CA)

Mammillaria haageana (Huntington Library Desert Garden, San Marino, CA)

Opuntia engelmannii (Joshua Tree National Park, CA)

Silver torch cactus, Cleistocactus strausii (Huntington Library, San Marino, CA)

Beavertail prickly pear, Opuntia basilaris (Anza-Borrego State Park, CA)

Needle in a Haystack


Monday was a fine sunny day to visit Seattle Center. The Space Needle is so tall (605ft/184m) that it can be seen from anywhere on the 40-acre campus, even through leafy trees.

It’s Spring Time Again at the Bellevue Botanical Garden


Despite the wettest weather we’ve had on record, signs of spring are everywhere in the Pacific Northwest. I visit the Bellevue Botanical Garden at this time of year to admire the plants, flowers and trees that remind me that this is the season of rejuvenation. The garden is undergoing extensive renovation to improve the visitor’s experience. Remarkably, admission is free of charge. Located just off the urban core where Bellevue’s downtown area is experiencing explosive growth—too much steel, concrete and highrise for my taste—the garden is a sanctuary of quiet, serenity and beauty.

Bellevue Botanical Garden
12001 Main Street
Bellevue, WA 98005
425.452.2750

Serenity by the Sea


It amazes me that seabirds can find comfort in daunting places. Below an overlook somewhere south of Cape Perpetua on the Oregon coast, I saw this gull resting on a rocky ledge high above crashing waves, not bothered by a stiff wind ruffling its feathers nor a loud colony of sea lions barking from the beach below.

Sea lions